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Illegal Checkpoints Can Only Be Stopped NOW

illegal checkpointFew know that the real purpose of MADD was to normalize illegal checkpoints and now that we have reached the point where Americans are being strapped down against their will and having their life blood taken from inside of them without their consent this can only be rightfully defined as EVIL. For those who have a hard time accepting this truth please research ‘social engineering‘ and then read the first sentence again.

So why can the checkpoints only be stopped now? Because people accept the reality that is presented to them and for many who were born more recently then I, random checkpoints already ARE the norm. Either those who recognize it for the atrocity that it is rise up and stop the checkpoints or they will be here until the people are destroyed.

illegal checkpoints july 4th

This understanding, as well as the coming 4th of July excuse for setting up the checkpoints, brought this issue to the forefront of my mind and so I have declared WAR on these checkpoints starting with the creation of the only anti checkpoint facebook group that I am aware of and yes – there are facebook groups actually in support of the checkpoints but after Watertown nothing should surprise us. Those people probably pray to the alleged government before they go to bed at night.

Here is the new group please join it, invite others and RIGHT NOW search to find where they are setting up checkpoints in your area

Put that information in the group and lets start working together to expose and shut down these ABOMINATIONS!

More on Social Engineering:

The term sociale ingenieurs was introduced in an essay by the Dutch industrialist J.C. Van Marken in 1894. The idea was that modern employers needed the assistance of specialists—”social engineers”—in handling the human problems of the planet, just as they needed technical expertise (ordinary engineers) to deal with the problems of dead matter (materials, machines, processes). The term was brought to America in 1899, when the notion of “social engineering” was also launched as the name of the task of the social engineer in this sense. “Social engineering” was the title of a small journal in 1899 (from 1900 named “Social Service”), and in 1909 the title of a book by its former editor, William H. Tolman (translated in French in 1910), marking the end of the usage of the terminology in the sense of Van Marken. With the Social Gospel sociologist Edwin L. Earp’s The Social Engineer, published during the “efficiency craze” of 1911 in the U.S., the usage of the term was launched that has since then been standard: the one building on a metaphor of social relations as “machineries”,[2] to be dealt with in the manner of the technical engineer.[3]

Before one can engage in social engineering, one must have reliable information about the society that is to be engineered and effective tools to carry out the engineering. Both of these became available only relatively recently: roughly within the past one hundred years.

While social engineering can be carried out by any organization. whether large or small, public or private, the most comprehensive (and often the most effective) campaigns of social engineering are those initiated by powerful central governments.

Extremely intensive social engineering campaigns occurred in countries with authoritarian governments. In the 1920s, the government of the Soviet Union embarked on a campaign to fundamentally alter the behavior and ideals of Soviet citizens, to replace the old social frameworks of Tsarist Russia with a new Soviet culture, to create the New Soviet man. The Soviets used newspapers, books, film, mass relocations, and even architectural design tactics to serve as “social condenser” and change personal values and private relationships. Similar examples are the Chinese “Great Leap Forward” and “Cultural Revolution” program and the Khmer Rouge‘s plan of deurbanization of Cambodia. In Singapore, the government’s housing policies attempt to promote a mix of all races within each subsidized housing district in order to foster social cohesion and national loyalty while providing citizens with affordable housing.[citation needed] In Tanzania in the 1970s, the government pursued a policy of enforced villagisation under Operation Vijiji in order to promote collective farming.[4]

Non-authoritarian regimes tend to rely on more sustained social engineering campaigns that create more gradual, but ultimately far-reaching, change. Examples include the “War on Drugs” in the United States, the increasing reach of intellectual propertyrights and copyright, and the promotion of elections as a political tool. The campaign for promoting elections, which is by far the most successful of the three examples, has been in place for over two centuries. Social theorists of the Frankfurt School inWeimar Germany like Theodor Adorno had also observed the new phenomenon of mass culture and commented on its new manipulative power, when the rise of the Nazis drove them out of the country around 1930 (many of them became connected with the Institute for Social Research in the United States). The Nazis themselves were no strangers to the idea of influencing political attitudes and redefining personal relationships. The Nazi propaganda machine under Joseph Goebbels was a synchronized, sophisticated and effective tool for creating public opinion.

In a similar vein the Greek military junta of 1967–1974 attempted to steer Greek public opinion not only by propaganda but also by inventing new words and slogans such as palaiokommatismos (old-partyism), Ellas Ellinon Christianon (Greece of Christian Greeks), and Ethnosotirios Epanastasis (nation-saving revolution, meaning coup d’état).

Social engineering can be used as a means to achieve a wide variety of different results, as illustrated by the different governments and other organizations that have employed it. The discussion of the possibilities for such manipulation became especially active following World War II, with the advent of television, and continuing discussion of techniques of social engineering, particularly in advertising, is still quite pertinent in the western model of consumer capitalism.


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